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20130101
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CSPAN 10
CSPAN2 4
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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 10:00am EST
borrowing is something they are not able to do. someone who is getting a bachelor of science in nursing can afford to take on more debt than someone getting a degree in religious studies or a low income field. it does not mean you should abandon the degree. it means you should pay attention to the debt, because you may abandon the dream later. >> not all degrees are worth as much is something those of us who love liberal arts in the united states have a hard time coming to grips with. >> or journalism. >> is -- it obviously makes people uncomfortable that the situation is further curtailed by the family were born into. if you are a wonderful high school student, you have to think more about your major and your college than a student born into a wealthy family. how do you balance that with the reality of this crisis. >> one of the things we do at the national consumer law center is direct representation of low-income borrowers as well as speak to thousands of borrowers throughout the country. we do see the effect of this threw out the country. many students do not graduate. there is default.
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 1:00pm EST
master it." "it is almost a science, and yet if is a puzzle without an answer. it requires complete concentration and total relaxation. it satisfies the soul, fortifies the intellect. it is at the same time, rewarding and frustrating." mr. palmer, we had your golf partner's statute shipped in here, too. i think he just dropped the potter. -- putter. [laughter] i thought -- i am not a great golfer, but as a psychologist, i understand the psychology of the sport in that sense. and i thought, since there's probably one our two call first -- golfers here, i can probably pass on to you what i think is the greatest golf device ever, and it is a story about mr. palmer and the manager of the detroit tigers. i was having dinner with jim, who is also known to have a colorful word or two when he speaks, and he told me about a round of golf he was playing with arnold palmer. he was chipping everywhere but the affair with. -- but the fairway. i am sure that he had a word or two. after a few holes or so, mr. palmer said to him "jim, which you like a little advice?" think about that. if any of us
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 3:32pm EST
the bang for the box -- the buck. the basic science knowledge. testimony point out that we need to know these things. there are other societal benefits. isn't that really the way we should think of going? if dark basic expansion of knowledge through a government funded entity like nasa -- is that the way we should go? my personal feeling is there is a tremendous value over time that has come close from demand i do believe robotics will be on the time scale of the next 20 years as -- or so. probably as they make predictions, which is always hard. it will have more economic impact on how we were driving our cars and fly our planes and how research is being performed. it is my belief if you go through 30 or more years, that prediction will be a lot tougher to make. want to put the human in the loop and go to places where you do not know where you are going, and two exploration the help of sun cover aspects of our experience and did all aspects of technology that will have tremendous impact. even though they examples you mention are compelling, there are many aspects that come from a human
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 7:00am EST
cuts should be extended and for whom. taxation is not an economic science. it definitely -- if you gather 10 people in a room, you're going to get 10 different opinions and the views on taxing -- on the merits and philosophy of taxing individual asks the rich will vary. but, you know, this sort of immediate problem is not necessarily the larger philosophical question. it really is the more practical question of what is our tax system going to look like. host: and we've got this lead editorial from this morning's "wall street journal." real housewife offense the beltway. they write -- host: back to the phones. don in oklahoma city on our line for democrats. go ahead, don. caller: good morning. i have a couple of quick comments i would like to make. the first is that i find it ironic for so many years in recent history republicans have claimed to own patriotism yet they don't seem to want to vacate their fair share. host: joseph rosenberg. guest: you know, i mean, i'm not sure, you know, i'm not sure this is about pay. -- patriotism or anything like that. you know, the question of wh
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 10:00am EST
and steady passions and interests, to that extent, there will be a new science of politics. the science of politics based on what all human beings have in common, acknowledged supplied by the senses. because people do not agree about religious truths, and because they fight over their disagreements, social tranquility is served by regarding religion as voluntary matter for private judgment. not state-supported and state enforced. in the interest of social peace, the higher aspirations of the ancient political philosophers were pushed to the margins of modern politics. those aspirations were considered, at best, unrealistic. at worst, downright dangerous. henceforth, politics would not be a sphere in which human nature is perfected. political project would not include appointing people towards their highest potentials. instead, a modern politics would be based on the assumption that people will express and will act upon the strong impulses of their flawed nature's. the ancients had asked, what is the highest of which mankind is capable? how can we pursue this in politics? hobbes asked, w
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 1:00am EST
in good standing, has the assumption that as science, rationalism, and the rationality of society advances, the disenchantment of the world proceeds apace, forces will lose their history shaping saliency. the two biggest forces are religion and ethnicity. everyday, in every region, people refute this. religion, and especially religion entangled with reinforcing ethnicity, still drive histoes history. religion is also central to america's public philosophy. at the risk of offending the specialists, let me offer a brief placement of america's founders in the stream of world political philosophy. machiavelli begins modern political philosophy. his is a demarcation between the ancients and the moderns. the ancients took their political bearings from their understanding of the best of which people were capable. they sought to and large the likelihood of the emergence of fine and noble leaders. and the fine and noble attributes among them. machiavelli took his bearings from people as they are. he defined the political project as making the best of this flawed material. he knew, almost t
MSNBC
Dec 29, 2012 5:00am PST
and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. [ buzzing ] bye dad. drive safe. k. love you. [ chirping, buzzing continues ] [ horn honks ] [ buzzing continues ] [ male announcer ] the sprint drive first app. blocks and replies to texts while you drive. we can live without the &. visit sprint.com/drive. >>> talking this morning about the next economy. what the economy should and will look like after the great recession after we go back to full employment, if and whenever that ever happens. and how that affects workers. karl, the question on the table is can we have a prosperous economy and also in this increasingly flexible freelance situation? >> people like the security of an employment relationship and as workers have had less and less bargaining power in the market they've lost wage growth and employment growth. those are separate symptoms of the same thing. it's entirely possible to provide that with high wages without those things. those are two things that people like and as they have gotten worse and worse, the
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 8:00pm EST
expectancy. it was, and still is, an assumption that as science and the rationality -- as the disenchantment of the world's, pre-modern forces will lose their history. the two most important of these are religion. events refute the liberal expectancy. religion still drives history. religion is also central to the emergence of america's public philosophy. at the risk of offending specialists by distortion through compression, what we offer a very brief placement of americans foundries. machiavelli begins modern political philosophy. this spot is a convenient demarcation. the agents -- ancients saw to enlarge the likelihood of the emergence of noble leaders. machiavelli, however, took his bearings from people as they are. he defined the political project as making the best of this flawed material. he knew that nothing would ever be made from the crooked timber of humanity. machiavelli was no democrat. he reoriented politics towards accommodations, strong and predictable forces rising from a great constant, human nature common to all people in all stations. for 44 years, machiavelli and luther
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 7:00am EST
. so, yes, i am unaffiliated. host: here is the "christian science monitor," their cover. the new face of faith. what is happening in new england, the countries most secular region, may have a future of american religion. traditional religions are seeing their ranks thinned out while alternative churches are becoming more popular. the arc is symbolic of a transforming religious landscape in new england -- will read a little bit more from the magazine piece this morning to continue to give your thoughts on religion and whether it and loved politics. loraine and michigan. republican number. caller: it influences my voting because -- acs, like before, that is a religion. i should have a right to vote with our savior. a country founded on the bible is not a country at all -- makes it very clear. you have to have your belief system. without it, i think a that will exist. host: kathleen, of riverside, ohio. democratic caller. caller: i grew up catholic and went to catholic school but i am no longer a catholic. i would not define myself as a catholic. i got into comparative religious studies
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 9:00am EST
at the urban institute, and alisha coleman- jensen jensen, a social science fellow at the usda. i want to show this map, which might surprise people. virginia, maryland, pennsylvania, new york, they have less food insecurity. in the deep south, states like georgia, alabama, mississippi, texas and in california, there is more food insecurity. why? guest: there is regional variation, ranging from a low of 8% to a high of 19%. research has shown there are factors for households within the state, and also factors like economic conditions at the state level and state policies that affect food insecurity. the poverty rate in the unemployment rate varies across states, the level of education berries and other factors such as region varies, and other factors such as participation in food programs varies. the cost of housing, the average wages -- all of these factors affect food insecurity. host: susan, dayton, ohio. good morning. caller: i really admire the program and an emphasis on nutritious food, and i was wondering if there were any thoughts going toward that same thing with the snap program. gue
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 8:00pm EST
of the arts in favor of science, in favor of technology but it strikes me that what you just said and the context of the book and the fact that we still have the sort of need for the untold stories for the dark secrets is indicative of a kind of historical illiteracilliterac y that exists in our country and that african-americans and that black history in africana history itself with the subject that is most unknown or he raced from our collective consciousness. do you think that historical illiteracy contributes to our present and even to our future? do you see the larger story that you tell here as essential to your vision of the country we ought to live in? >> i don't know that i have thought about it in that way. what i definitely thought about was how reflective her family was of the american story and i wanted very much to imbue it with the history so that people could see that her family had front row seats to some of the most important moments in our history slavery, civil war emancipation, the migration, jim crow, the depression and that all their steps forward and steps
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 8:00pm EST
got his ba in political science from the university of florida and m.a. and phd from the university of michigan. so he speaks for the heartland of our great country. >> the automobile industry. last night and he was stopping production of vx. the electors frequently, as solid and no satisfactory radio and television shows onto human kind. even norm has competed for the misquotations in any given year and multimedia. norm is a resident scholar at the american enterprise institute for public policy research. he writes a column for roll call. he's written for every publication on the face of the earth. he and tom both have been on the news hour with jim lehrer, and "nightline" charlie rose. he has another heart and are coming ba, magna laude from university of minnesota and a phd from university of michigan, which is where you guys met. i just have to say that one of the reasons why i think tom and warm is so much attention the outlook piece is because they have been spending their entire lives being so moderate and reasonable that would make it not, there really must be something wron
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 11:00pm EST
chair, had a governmental studies program, got his ba in political science from university of florida in this animated phd from the university of michigan. so he speaks for the heartland of our great country. >> any cd automobile industry. [laughter] >> and was opposed by stopping production of the units sold. the electors are solid in all and is on every show known to humankind. they've often competed for the most quotations in any given year than all of our media. norm is a resident scholar at the representative for public policy research. the election analyst for cbs and has written for every publication on the face of the earth dirty and tom both have been on the news hour with jim lehrer, "nightline," charlie rose. he has another heartland are, ba university of minnesota phd from the university of michigan, which is where you guys met. i just have to say that one of the reasons why i think that tom and norm for so much attention is because they have been spending their entire lives being so moderate and reasonable that when they get mad, they really must be something wrong. so wh
CBS
Dec 25, 2012 7:00am PST
of officiating. it's an imperfect science. we think we have the best but we need to continue to improve. >> nfl football is one of the most attractive sports in terms of television and everything else. it's american -- americans love football. do you think it can expand beyond america? >> well, we had great success over in the u.k. next year we'll expand it to two games and we're playing in toronto. we have had great success in other markets like mexico and the far east. i believe our future is very bright overseas. the game is very popular. our fans on a global basis want more and more football. that's what we're doing. we're responding to that interest. >> you talked about the culture. football players in the nfl are role models and in the nba as well and in other professional sports. how do you make sure that the players appreciate that by their personal conduct? >> well, we have a personal conduct policy which was put together with the players. and it's very important because they are role models and they're held to a higher standard. i think all of us in the nfl are held
MSNBC
Dec 29, 2012 7:00am PST
... or wonderfully the market's behaving... which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> since this show began in february, we have closed out nearly every saturday program with a segment called "foot soldiers" and it is a feature highlighting one person or group who has created positive action in the communities for change. this is large or small. and the foot soldiers have ranged from the three new jersey girls who was a presidential moderator, to dr. mcstuffins who shows girls they, too, can be doctors. and the father and son teen who got out to get out the vote for people during hurricane isaac and simply because they had a vote, and activism. all of our foot soldiers are changing our lives. f for the first time ever, i have a table full of them. and i am joined by a director of a support for children whose parents are in prison, and also, a founder for children of lgbt youth, and also project director of a center for victims of sexual assault, and also, the drek er tor of osborne association which offers rehabilitation for those in the criminal justice system. i
NBC
Dec 27, 2012 7:00am EST
becomes a reality. >> reporter: a harsh reality but one with some science behind it. last year, researchers of sanford university found out once participants were introduced to their future self, they were more likely to save. sounds good in theory but not experts agree it will actually work in practice. >> i'm not actually sure a stark financial physical picture is exactly what they need in order to compel them to action. >> reporter: with more americans retiring later in life and the cost of living going up, experts say two-thirds of boomers will not have enough saved to maintain their standard of live, if they can retire at all. whether or not it will actually inspire people to take action, it certainly gets you thinking. >> it does inspire me to save for retirement, absolutely. >> reporter: now, a big thank you to our brave guinea pig, the 2,000 people who logged on to view this app, unclear how many have been spurred as we heard a lot about new year's resolutions right around the corner, if they get to the new year and decide this was scary enough to get them to start savi
CNN
Dec 26, 2012 9:00am PST
. >>> it is hard to believe, but 2013 less than a week away. we're going to look back at all the science breakthroughs of the last year coming up. ♪ everybody well don't you know it's me now? ♪ ♪ yeah who's it, who's it huh? ♪ ♪ willy's back with a brand new beat now, ♪ ♪ yeah doin' it doin' it up! ♪ heyyy yeah, tryin' to bite my style! ♪ ♪ heyyy yeah, how you like me now? ♪ ♪ na na na na na na na na ♪ and everybody go uh! campbell's has 24 new soups that will make it drop over, and over again. ♪ from jammin' jerk chicken, to creamy gouda bisque. see what's new from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >>> starbucks is now pushing politicians to avoid the massive spending cuts due to go into effect six dames from now. the ceo is asking employees at the d.c. area stores to write "come together" on their coffee cups tomorrow and friday. in a letter to employees made public today, shuttle says rather than be bystanders, you and your customers have an opportunity and i believe we all have a responsibility, to send our elected officials a respectful but poten
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 11:00pm EST
's our representative of the disinvestment of humanity, arts in favor of commerce, science, technolog y. but what you just said and the context within need for the untold stories is indicative of the historical literacy that's black history is the subject that is most of known or erased from our collective consciousness. is that where literacy contributes to our future? the larger story is essential to your vision of the country we ought to live then. >> guest: i don't know. i thought about how reflective her family was of the american story. i wanted to to imbue with a history so people could see her family had front-row seats to the most important moments. slavery, a civil war, and emancipation, migration, jim crow, a depression, and all the steps forward and back were reflected of who we are. >> host: did you think of it as a smaller project? not to put it in context the individuals of the family tree but it became a social history of rural and urban urban, a southern and northern sweeping, intimate. did that scale have been as a result of their research with pen to paper and fought
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 2:00pm EST
.s. department of agriculture, social science analyst. thank you for being with us. >> thank you for having us. >> tomorrow, we will continue looking at fiscal cliff negotiations and how americans will be affected if the deadline passes. our guest will be joseph rosenberg, followed by a look by presidential campaigning and the influence of the electoral college. then a discussion on hurricane sandy relief funding. we will be joined by dan freed iedman. all that beginning at 7:00 a.m. eastern here on c-span. ♪ >> if we turn away from the needs of others, we align ourselves with those forces which are bringing about this suffering. >> the white house is a bully pulpit and you ought to take advantage of it. >> obesity is nothing short of a public health conference. >> i think i had little antennas go up that told me when somebody had there an agenda. >> it would be a shame to waste it. >> i think they serve as a window on the past to what was going on with american women. >> she becomes the chief confidante, really any way the only one in the world he could trust. >> they were writers, journali
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19